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HobbyBoss 1/72 scale Kamov Ka-29 “Helix-B”

This model kit is made for modelers of intermediate or better skills — beginners may find the instructions and design do not provide sufficient guidance.
RELATED TOPICS: AIRCRAFT
Kit:No. 87227 // Scale:1/72 // Price:$33.99
Manufacturer:
HobbyBoss, from Squadron Mail Order, 877-414-0434
Pros:
Accurate shapes; good level of detail
Cons:
Simplified interior; minor fit issues; rotor blades sit slightly too low
Comments:
Injection-molded, 229 parts, decals
MOD-MO0611_100
FSM-WB1011_32
FSM-WB1011_33
FSM-WB1011_34
FSM-WB1011_35
The Russians do a good job of adapting existing equipment to tasks outside its original design. One such example is the Ka-29 “Helix-B,” which is a naval helicopter made into a flying tank.

HobbyBoss’ kit includes cockpit and cabin detail, optional sensor packs, an extensive weapons set, and markings for two aircraft.

Building the cockpit is a straightforward affair. There is no detail on the instrument panels, nor is there a decal for the instrument panel. The cabin furnishings are for the naval troop version. None of the ammo cases or structure to mount the 30mm cannon are included (not that they can be seen through the small windows).

The rotor masthead comprises 24 parts. Care must be taken in the alignment of the counter-rotating blade offset. There is no keying or jig to help with this. Once the assembly was glued and dried, I added the blades and set it all aside for final assembly.

Adding the interior to the fuselage halves was no trouble. The cockpit doors and windows had slight gaps between them that I filled with white glue. I also had to fill in the gap between the engine intakes and the fuselage (also with white glue). There are optional sensor packs, but no instructions on which ones to use. I painted the exhaust deflectors Testors Metalizer exhaust.

The weapons pylons were a little tricky to assemble and install on the fuselage sides. The instructions missed the upper hole on the port side. The rear landing supports (parts C50 and 50) have a notch for the pylon support (parts B22 and B17) to tie into.

My biggest problem was choosing weapons. I added B-8s and UB-32s to my helicopter; you’ll have to look at references in the instructions to arm yours.

I added the small parts and clear parts at final assembly. Then I added the rotor blades and found they sat a little too low, with the blades hitting the top of the fuselage. You’ll need to bring the rotor assembly up slightly to clear.

I painted the model with Gunze aircraft gray and a mix of Testors British dark green and gull gray, using Silly Putty as masks for the camouflage scheme.

Choosing the markings for Red 23 of “Mistral LHD Helicopter Sqn. 2010,” I found the decals tended to stick quickly and were hard to move into place.

It took me 20 hours to complete this project. However, a less-experienced modeler might have more trouble with the trickier assemblies. So, I would recommend this one only to modelers of intermediate or better skills — beginners may find the instructions and design do not provide sufficient guidance.

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